Barolo That Won’t Break the Bank

Today’s Story: G.D. Vajra

G.D. Vajra was established in 1972 by Aldo Vaira and is named after his father Giuseppe Domenico. A few years earlier, in 1968 to be exact, Aldo joined a mass of student protestors in the streets of Turin however was discovered by his father and immediately sent to his grandparents’ farm in Barolo for a summer away from trouble. After spending several months on the farm, Aldo’s dream of one day starting a winery began to blossom and he joined Suolo e Salute in 1971 where he became a pioneer of organic agriculture in Piedmont. With the inclement weather and poor vintage of 1972, Aldo was faced with either leaving his fruit on the vines to rot or defiantly bottle wines, laying the foundation of G.D. Vajra. During the mid 1980s and early 1990s, Aldo’s three children Giuseppe, Francesca, and Isidoro were born and continue to operate the winery today as a family endeavor.

G.D. Vajra is located in the village of Vergne in the commune of Barolo, with vineyards planted 400 meters above sea level. Over time, Aldo gradually increased his land holdings under vine to 60 hectares of which 10 hectares are planted to Nebbiolo. With vines located in Bricco delle Viole, Ravera, Fossati, La Volta, and Coste di Vergne amongst other sites, Aldo crafts magnificent wines in a traditionalist style coupled with modern practices particularly when it comes to using oak. To learn more about G.D. Vajra or scroll through their portfolio of wines, check out the website here.

Today’s Wine: 2011 Barolo Albe

100% Nebbiolo; 14.5% ABV

The 2011 Albe is bright medium ruby red in color and moderately transparent. Once this opens up in the decanter, the nose offers aromas of black raspberry, bing cherry, licorice, rose petal, smoke, tar, forest floor, black tea, white pepper, and oak. There’s also some heat on the nose that will take some time to blow off. Once in the mouth, I get notes of sour cherry, raspberry, strawberry, truffle, scorched earth, tobacco, crushed granite, chocolate, and oaky spice. This wine is full-bodied with high acidity, medium (+) tannins, and a medium (+) length finish.

Price: $36. At this price point I was hoping for a lot out of this bottle in terms of value, but the wine seems a bit too out of balance for me particularly with the alcohol. While 2011 was not a bad vintage for Barolo by any means, maybe it would be better to try something from 2010 or 2015. Pair this with pheasant, duck, or pork chops.

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